LICHEN PLANUS

banner

LICHEN PLANUS

What is LICHEN PLANUS?

An autoimmune skin condition, which may also affect the scalp, nails and mouth that causes swelling (small, colored, flat bumps), irritation, itching which usually persists for a few months to years.

WHY DOES IT OCCUR?

It occurs when the body’s immune system (self-defense mechanism) mistakenly attacks skin cells. Though various causes have been said to be the trigger the specific cause is yet to be identified through research.

e

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE LICHEN PLANUS?

The symptoms or signals of the body indicating Lichen Planus are varied and they may range from mild to moderate. The following are some of the most common symptoms:

  • Purplish bumps (in fair complexion ), Dark / black bumps( in brown complexion) found on inner arms, wrists, forearms,  also ankles or groin regions.
  • White-colored lesions/patches in the mouth
  • Itching
  • Scabs, bruises on scratching lesions, blisters
  • Hair Loss
  • Scalp color change
  • Sores in Mouth region
  • Nail damage.
e

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE LICHEN PLANUS?

The symptoms or signals of the body indicating Lichen Planus are varied and they may range from mild to moderate. The following are some of the most common symptoms:

  • Purplish bumps (in fair complexion ), Dark / black bumps( in brown complexion) found on inner arms, wrists, forearms,  also ankles or groin regions.
  • White-colored lesions/patches in the mouth
  • Itching
  • Scabs, bruises on scratching lesions, blisters
  • Hair Loss
  • Scalp color change
  • Sores in Mouth region
  • Nail damage.

WHEN TO APPROACH A 

DOCTOR?

Though the symptoms can be mild to moderate, it is a condition which requires proper medical treatment and advice. Hence it is best to approach your specialist at the earliest possible when the above symptoms of rashes, itching are seen.

d

WHEN TO APPROACH A

DOCTOR?

Though the symptoms can be mild to moderate, it is a condition which requires proper medical treatment and advice. Hence it is best to approach your specialist at the earliest possible when the above symptoms of rashes, itching are seen.

d

TREATMENT :

Lichen planus fades away after treatment in months to years. If the disease affects your mouth, it tends to be more resistant to treatment and prone to recur. Whatever treatment is used follow-up appointments with your specialist are required about once or twice a year.

Medications and other treatments might help relieve itching, ease pain, and promote healing. Therapy can be effort consuming. Specialist advice is required for personalized treatment to have maximum benefit.

TREATMENT :

Lichen planus fades away after treatment in months to years. If the disease affects your mouth, it tends to be more resistant to treatment and prone to recur. Whatever treatment is used follow-up appointments with your specialist are required about once or twice a year.

Medications and other treatments might help relieve itching, ease pain, and promote healing. Therapy can be effort consuming. Specialist advice is required for personalized treatment to have maximum benefit.

Immune suppressants

The first and most commonly preferred treatment of lichen planus is usually a prescription corticosteroid cream. If that doesn’t help and your condition is severe or widespread, your specialist might suggest a corticosteroid pill or injection.

Common side effects include skin irritation or thinning where the cream is applied and oral thrush. Corticosteroids are considered safe when taken as directed by your specialist.

Oral drugs

Other oral medicines used in selected situations for this condition by specialists are the antimalarial hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic metronidazole.

Immune system modification

Severe signs and symptoms may require prescription medications that suppress or modify your body’s immune response. (EX: Methotrexate, Azathioprine)

Antihistamines

An antihistamine medication taken by mouth might relieve the itching of lichen planus.

Phototherapy

Light therapy may help clear up lichen planus affecting the skin. The most common phototherapy for lichen planus uses ultraviolet B  light, which penetrates only the upper layer of skin. Light therapy usually requires two to three treatments a week for several weeks.

This therapy isn’t recommended for dark-skinned people as it has an increased risk of changing skin color in unaffected areas.

Retinoids

If your condition doesn’t respond to other treatments, your specialist might prescribe a retinoid tablet taken orally

Retinoids aren’t recommended for women who are pregnant or may become pregnant.

OTHER ADVICE:

  • Apply moisturiser on lesions
  • Avoid scratching lesions
  • For oral lesions avoid smoking, drinking, spicy foods for the duration of treatment to have more optimal results.
  • Eat an antioxidant rich, well balanced diet and follow a healthy lifestyle.